Ask Dr. Annie K: Transition In Parenting

My 11-year-old said (more like yelled,) “Stop telling me what to do!” Wait a second. Isn’t that basically my job to tell him what to do? Any words of wisdom on the transition in parenting, from constantly telling our kids what to do to letting them figure things out on their own?
– Anonymous Reader

Love+Medicine

Transition in parenting, hmm. Let me begin by saying I am not a child psychiatrist so this is not my area of expertise. But I have basic concepts that I believe in and think they would work here.

I also consulted with one of my favorite 11 year olds, to get a take on the situation from a child’s perspective.

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The Paradox of Water

Ask Dr. Annie K: Why is water so important in life?

Water is full of contradictions. It’s soft, yet strong. It appears still, yet it is constantly in motion. It can be silent or loud. It can be solid, liquid, or vapor. It can be salty or sweet. It can be scary and dangerous but also comforting and purifying. It allows us to both observe its beauty and use it to cleanse.

By being exposed to water, we are witnessing the movement and flow of life. It takes away our delusions of control. For people who see things black and white, water can be confronting. They may prefer to admire it from a distance rather than get close. Water reminds us that we don’t need to label ourselves.  We are capable of adjusting to the opposite forces of nature. Fighting the current can sink you, floating can save your life.

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Ask Dr. Annie K.

A new feature on Love+Medicine!

Here is where I take questions from you, my wonderful readers.
Any subject is fair game. Questions may be sent anonymously.

Ask A Question


 

Today I was asked an interesting question I’d like to share.
A patient asked me:

“Is there a such thing as broken heart syndrome?”

 

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Broken heart syndrome is, sadly, a real malady. It is also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.  Takotsubo, a type of octopus trap (!), was first described in Japan in 1990.  When someone suffers from an event that causes stress, it can take a toll on the heart. The stressor can be from any type of sudden news or confronting situation such as

  • loss or illness of someone close – a relative, friend, pet
  • intense fear – public speaking, while engaging in high risk sports
  • severe pain
  • rejection
  • domestic violence
  • receiving bad news – such as a cancer diagnosis
  • witnessing an accident
  • sudden financial loss
  • a surprise

Scientists believe that the event causes an increase in the “stress hormone” called adrenalin. Adrenalin causes the heart to overwork and eventually weaken, particularly the left ventricle. Clinically, it looks just like a heart attack. The patient complains of the typical symptoms of chest pain and shortness of breath. A complete work up to rule out a heart attack is needed, STAT! An EKG may show signs of a heart attack but in broken heart syndrome there are actually no blockages in the arteries surrounding the heart! Cardiac enzymes may increase, like in a heart attack, but the increase is small. Heart cells are merely “stunned”, they are not killed like in a heart attack.

The illness occurs almost exclusively in women, generally between the ages of 58-75. The good news is that it is reversible and most patients are better in one-two months. In rare cases it can be fatal, if the patient develops heart failure as a result of the weakness of the heart.

As humans we are very adaptable, but some situations are devastating to such a degree that, as we see, the heart can indeed be broken. No one should be alone while experiencing extreme physical and emotional stress. Even if the incident appears trivial and doesn’t warrant this degree of sadness, this is no time for judgement. There is no timeline for overcoming loss- so silly how we learned in medical school, one month of grieving for every year together- everyone is different. Be there, for as long as it takes.

 

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