Soup

There’s a tradition in our family started by Eva, my dad’s wife, to make a big pot of soup and have it ready when someone comes home from a trip. When you are jetlagged, the last thing you want to do is go out to a restaurant or cook. After a shower, opening the refrigerator and seeing a beautiful pot of soup in the fridge is nirvana. Soup made with love – you can taste the difference. 

I made a pot of homemade chicken soup and matzoh balls about two months ago in anticipation of Jeff coming back from Israel. He had been there since January, working in a busy Emergency Department in Ashdod, Israel. Today, I am defrosting the soup made for him. I don’t think I’m going to see him for a while.

I know for some of you it’s tough to quarantine with family. Tempers are short. You don’t have the usual distractions. But quarantining alone is no picnic. Everyone in my family is on lockdown in their prospective countries.  

My brother is staying here. He too, separated from family. And it’s kind of weird to live with your brother for weeks in the house you grew up in. It just adds to the surreality. 

We are both in Milwaukee with our 99 year old father. Even for a Holocaust survivor this current situation “feels like the end of the world”. He watches at a distance, as an outsider. His joie de vivre, social interaction, has been snatched from him. His hospice nurse recommends the two of us “use FaceTime or something” instead of visiting. His apartment is a short walk from my house. Going there makes me anxious but not going is even harder. Isolation and loneliness are leading to a huge decline in his quality of life.

So when I cook he wants Hungarian meals from the old country like Káposztás Tészta (cabbage and noodles), cholent and Toltott Kaposzta (stuffed cabbage). And of course soup.

Make soup for someone you love, they can taste the difference.

HAPPY NEW YEAR💜

loveandmedicine.com has had a great year. In case you may have missed something, here are all of the posts from 2019.

Read and reread! This year I’d love to see more comments and dialog.

ASK DR. ANNIE K. is open 24/7 and is 100% anonymous.

I know there is a lot of crap out there to read. There is an epidemic of pseudo-science and medical BS being read by millions. Would you go to a plumber to fix your teeth? Don’t go to a celebrity for medical advice. I’m guilty of it too – remember when I bought Sex Dust? That was the old me 😉. Let’s not do that. In this blog you will find facts, not fads. I do my homework.

If you are curious, the most popular post this year was How Hard Can It Be? Understanding Erectile Dysfunction. A sign I need to focus more on sex and sexual dysfunction.

Most importantly, my readers, continue to be smart and skeptical. Stay strong and open to change. Kick-ass this decade! Remember:

“It’s the small habits. How you spend your mornings. How you talk to yourself. What you read. What you watch. Who you share your energy with. Who has access to you. That will change your life.”

Anne Koplin, Author of Love and Medicine

ASK DR. ANNIE K

Post Menopause
Legitimizing Mental Illness
Breaking the Cycle
Ovulation
Pain
B12 Injections
How Mental Health Can Affect Relationships

SEX
Magic Dust and Artichokes
Understanding Sexual Dysfunction
The Lifeguard

LIFE
The Best Weekend of the Year
Hello June
Celebrate Independence
Eat A Peach
Mercury Retrograde and What Does It Have to Do With You
Hula Hoops
Friday the 13th
7 Fool Proof Tips for Fall
The Weekend
Have a Peaceful Weekend

HEALTH
Sugar, Sugar
Stopping Antidepressants
The Secret Killer in Your DNA
Self-Love

FAMILY
Intercontinental Parenting
Am I the Only One Who Thought The Marriage Story was Lousy?
How To Throw a Great Wedding
The Way to a Man’s Heart
I’m Changing My Name Again and Here’s Why
Yes, Look Back

POETRY

Inspiration

7 FOOLPROOF TIPS FOR FALL 2019

The days are shorter, the temperatures are dropping. This is a time of transition both mentally and physically. Some love it, others are less enthusiastic. Here are some tips to help all of us stay present in the moment and accept the changes in this astounding universe. Let’s start with the one everyone loves to hate…

1.Get a flu shot. Get a flu shot. Get a flu shot. I know, you’ve heard me say this before but I need to repeat. The flu makes you feel totally miserable. It can also kill you. Millennials, are you listening? If you want to hang out with the most interesting people on the planet like older adults, babies, sick people and pregnant women you better get the shot. There are no medically proven dangers. Don’t listen to the pseudoscience fear-mongers.

2. Start a Vitamin D supplement. Even if you are outside a lot, you are too covered up to absorb the rays of the sun. Low vitamin D is linked to seasonal affective disorder, muscle and bone loss and Type 2 diabetes. Starting in October, I take 5000 IU’s of D3 based on my doctor’s recommendation after a blood test.

3. Invest in cold weather gear. This does not have to be expensive – I got a packable down jackets from Costco- but go for quality. And they should look good. You want to be able to hike and then meet a friend for dinner and look as classy as ever without going home to change. Remember there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad gear!

4. Work on your mindset. Your body is highly adaptable, it’s your mind that is less flexible. The obsession with the weather here in Wisconsin is absolutely insane. If you expect five miserable cold months, that is exactly what you will get. Get psyched for cozy clothing, hot fires, and winter sports. Embrace the lovely quiet and stillness of the winter. Read and write more.

5. Work out at home. There are times when you just won’t be up for getting dressed and driving to the gym. That’s ok! This is an opportunity to get out of your exercise rut and try something different. Believe it or not, I’ve started hula hooping again. Hula hooped through halftime of last nights football game! Many of my readers are fans of Adriene. She has easy to follow yoga videos for all levels. The enviable Michelle Obama reveals her workout secrets in this article. Then there is RBG’s workout for the rest of us.

6. Ignore the carbohydrate cravings. They can be overwhelming. Start with a protein rich breakfast – avocado, cottage cheese, eggs, nuts. Winter vegetables are particularly rich in antioxidants and color. Squash, leeks, garlic, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, pumpkin and kale are filling when simply prepared and delicately seasoned. My homegrown cauliflower plants are just starting to bloom. Salmon and other fatty fish remain essential for the gut and skin. Hydration is harder to maintain but should be a habit by now.

7. Laughter, friends and healthy sex are the most festive ways to raise those serotonin and dopamine levels. This is a Love and Medicine four- season recommendation 💜.

Sugar, sugar

Ask Dr. Annie K:

Why do I always crave something sweet after a big meal? Even if I ate enough and I feel full it seems like there’s room for a little dessert. Is there a medical explanation for this?

“Would you like to take a look at the dessert menu?”

Someone invariably in the group says yes.

It all goes back to the primal connection between our brain and our gut – why we refer to the gut as the “Second Brain”.

We could blame it all on ghrelin . Ghrelin is known as the “hunger hormone” which is produced in the gastrointestinal tract and brain. It stimulates the appetite and signals the brain to eat. New studies show that it can keep you eating, even when you are full. Consider the potential of this hormone to lead to a major medical breakthrough in weight management. It is one of many other factors that lead to overeating.

Sugar cravings happen for 3 primary reasons:

unstable sugar levels
emotional imbalance
habit

UNSTABLE SUGAR LEVELS

Eating food that is high in sugar and carbohydrates creates a quick, sharp rise in the level of sugar in your bloodstream. Insulin – a hormone secreted by the pancreas – kicks in to control blood sugar levels. As a result, blood sugar levels drop. Then the cravings start and that tiramisu is looking better and better. The sugar/insulin rollercoaster is dangerous. Besides the damage it does to our bodies, it wrecks havoc on mood and energy levels.

EMOTIONAL EATING

Any type of unbalanced emotional state can lead to sugar craving. Stress, anxiety, anger, and sadness can trigger a need of food, for comfort. Sugary desserts produce a serotonin and dopamine rush, neurotransmitters associated with mood-elevation. Feeling unusually happy can also incite cravings. A seriously great mood makes me want to celebrate with my favorite, marshmallows ;).

HABIT

Habit is a big one. If you grew up in a house where every meal ended in dessert, you may have simply developed the habit. Dessert follows dinner, no questions asked. It may be part of a tradition in your culture. This habit is now programmed in your mind.

A habit is still a choice and that choice is yours to make.

WHAT TO DO

The dangers associated with excessive sugar intact are documented facts. Sugar has been well studied. This is not one of those findings you can rationalize by saying “one day they say eggs are good for you, the next day they are bad”. FACT: High sugar is associated with obesity, tooth decay, accelerated aging of the skin, impaired cognition in children, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, depression and dementia. Type II diabetes is an epidemic in the western world.

I am not advocating cutting out all dessert. Stressing out over dessert is also unhealthy. If you need a little something sweet keep it little. A tiny dessert will relieve the craving with way less harm than the big dessert.

Ask Dr. Annie K: B12 Injections

Love+Medicine Vitamin B12
 

Should I get a B12 shot weekly @ 65 years old?

Love+Medicine

B12 injections have been popular for decades. This is the most fun part of my job as a writer – I learn new things. While researching for this article, I have learned that I am borderline B12 deficient. Enough about me (more later). Let’s get to the facts.

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