The Men’s Outerwear Conundrum

Let’s explore the world of men’s outerwear.

You can tell when a guy walks in a room and is looking good and more importantly, feeling comfortable.

As we transition from Winter to Spring, I consulted with a few men about the importance of mens outerwear. Most agreed there is a bit of a conundrum in that shopping is still somewhat perceived as a “female activity”. It also may seem like an “unnecessary luxury”. One argued that there is no conundrum whatsoever- that “the world of men’s outerwear is at a perfect place right now”.

Let’s see about that.

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Things I’ve Learned This Week

 

I timed my teeth brushing and was way under the recommended 2 minutes. Time yourself.

I was told by the advisor for the Brain/Gain program – a large campaign to bring scientists back to Israel – that my “age may be a problem” in finding employment.

Studying for the Geriatric Psychiatry boards is tedious and most likely useless.

I can eat sardines for dinner and be perfectly happy.

Even some of my closest friends don’t read my blog.

My hand surgeon can cure things – my carpal tunnel symptoms have disappeared since the surgery – unlike psychiatrists who can barely cure anything. If only we could treat anxiety and depression as easily.

The last season of Girls (HBO) is brilliant.

Bahá’í New Years was March 20-21.

10 Reasons to Visit Japan (that you won’t find in the guide book…)

1. Bathrooms

Once you leave home, finding a bathroom can be a challenge. In Japan, they are everywhere and are taken to a whole new level. Even in gas stations toilets have heated seats and music for privacy, and most of them will give you a wash and dry also.

2. Coffee shops

Dark and quiet and classy. You can sit there for hours and no one cares. Today I had a great latte, a nap, and plum liquor with soda on the rocks. Check out Sowgen and Cafe Bibliotec Hello.


3. Vending machines

When is the last time you saw beer in a vending machine? And quality coffee, in cans, that come out hot!

4. Baskets

A place to throw your stuff when you sit at a cafe or bar. Your hat, jacket, scarf. In Japan everything has its place.


5. Made for sharing.

Food is bite-sized and communal.


6. Ben Fiddich

The coolest bar I have ever been to. 1 Chome-13-7 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku. 9th floor. Tokyo.


7. Fruit sandwiches

Strawberry shortcake in a sandwich form for breakfast.


8. Cooking Classes

Whenever I travel I like to take a cooking class. This one was one of my favorites. Everybody prepared their own Bento box. This is the one – www.cooking-sun.com

9. Recycling

Japanese are serious about recycling. Not only is there no litter on the street, garbage cans are scarce and people bring their trash home. That’s how much they care.


10. It’s the perfect meeting spot.

If you go off season (steer clear of cherry blossom time and vacations), the airfare is reasonable, considering the distance. You can fly nonstop from most continents.

There is one big detraction I must mention. Although smoking is banned on the streets, it is allowed in bars, restaurants, schools and hospitals 😱 But that should not stop you from visiting this phenomenal place full of history, charm, Zen and some of the most delightful people you’ll ever meet. 

Ask Dr. Annie K: Being There for a Friend

A dear friend of mine lost her father a year ago and consistently brings him up in conservation. It’s hard when she goes on and on about how great he was and how she lost six significant males in her life within one year. My dad passed away ten years ago and I haven’t had one male in my family I could ever count on. My dad was, to put it lightly, a horrible person for the things he did to my mom and family. Every time my friend brings up her dad, it hits a dark sour spot for me. I’ve tried to talk to her about finding a way to find peace with what happened, but everyone handles things in their own time and in different ways. Is it insensitive of me to tell her that I don’t want to hear it so much? It’s ok when she would bring it up every now and then, but it’s very consistent now. I want to be a good friend and be there so I keep my mouth shut, and suppress my own personal feelings. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!!
– Anonymous Reader

Love+Medicine

Thank you for this thought-provoking question. It is so hard to see a friend in pain. 

My initial thought is that you need to just listen. There is no time limit on grief and it sounds like the hurt gets reenacted every time another man leaves her. Her psyche isn’t given the chance to heal. Part of being a good friend is to listen to her for as long as she needs you to. We all need to listen more and advise less. While we are wracking our brains trying to give the best answers, all people really want is to be heard. 

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