Sugar, sugar

Ask Dr. Annie K:

Why do I always crave something sweet after a big meal? Even if I ate enough and I feel full it seems like there’s room for a little dessert. Is there a medical explanation for this?

“Would you like to take a look at the dessert menu?”

Someone invariably in the group says yes.

It all goes back to the primal connection between our brain and our gut – why we refer to the gut as the “Second Brain”.

We could blame it all on ghrelin . Ghrelin is known as the “hunger hormone” which is produced in the gastrointestinal tract and brain. It stimulates the appetite and signals the brain to eat. New studies show that it can keep you eating, even when you are full. Consider the potential of this hormone to lead to a major medical breakthrough in weight management. It is one of many other factors that lead to overeating.

Sugar cravings happen for 3 primary reasons:

unstable sugar levels
emotional imbalance
habit

UNSTABLE SUGAR LEVELS

Eating food that is high in sugar and carbohydrates creates a quick, sharp rise in the level of sugar in your bloodstream. Insulin – a hormone secreted by the pancreas – kicks in to control blood sugar levels. As a result, blood sugar levels drop. Then the cravings start and that tiramisu is looking better and better. The sugar/insulin rollercoaster is dangerous. Besides the damage it does to our bodies, it wrecks havoc on mood and energy levels.

EMOTIONAL EATING

Any type of unbalanced emotional state can lead to sugar craving. Stress, anxiety, anger, and sadness can trigger a need of food, for comfort. Sugary desserts produce a serotonin and dopamine rush, neurotransmitters associated with mood-elevation. Feeling unusually happy can also incite cravings. A seriously great mood makes me want to celebrate with my favorite, marshmallows ;).

HABIT

Habit is a big one. If you grew up in a house where every meal ended in dessert, you may have simply developed the habit. Dessert follows dinner, no questions asked. It may be part of a tradition in your culture. This habit is now programmed in your mind.

A habit is still a choice and that choice is yours to make.

WHAT TO DO

The dangers associated with excessive sugar intact are documented facts. Sugar has been well studied. This is not one of those findings you can rationalize by saying “one day they say eggs are good for you, the next day they are bad”. FACT: High sugar is associated with obesity, tooth decay, accelerated aging of the skin, impaired cognition in children, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, depression and dementia. Type II diabetes is an epidemic in the western world.

I am not advocating cutting out all dessert. Stressing out over dessert is also unhealthy. If you need a little something sweet keep it little. A tiny dessert will relieve the craving with way less harm than the big dessert.

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