The Weekend

What are you up to this weekend? I’m laying low; I got no deeds to do, no promises to keep. Here are a few suggestions for reading and watching…have a good one!

If only I had the problem of big hair! This is a fun read about hair and identity.

How One Woman Refused to Let Anxiety And Anti-Semitism Define Her

I’ve been enjoying The Time of Our Lives on Amazon Prime Video. This very watchable Australian series tackles marriage, divorce, parenting, infidelity and adoption with sensitivity and keen insight.

I can easily recommend this book, before I have even finished it – Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators, Ronan Farrow’s new book. He recounts the Harvey Weinstein story and the Hollywood cover-ups with chilling detail. The mistreatment of women and the extent men are willing to go to silence them reaches far beyond the man and the victim – it is a team effort, in this case by NBC.

Ronan Farrow

Apples 🍎! After an afternoon of apple picking, I made applesauce mixing Macintosh, Gala, Fuji and Honeycrisp. I threw peeled and cored apples in the crock pot with juice from one lemon, a cinnamon stick and about a tablespoon of brown sugar and cooked 3-4 hours on high. That’s it! A few seconds of hand immersion blending created a smooth, bronze, creamy applesauce that tasted nothing like store-bought. Food porn at its finest.

My friend sent me this New Yorker article and I’d like to hear your thoughts . A long life is a gift. But will we really be grateful for it?

This past weekend the Kincaid fire couldn’t keep us away from a family wedding in The Sea Ranch, California. Quite the nauseating three hour drive from San Francisco but the place is special. A haunting, sparse, quiet place for celebrating love and healing along the craggy coast of the the pacific. Check it out.

Sunset at The Sea Ranch

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2 comments

  1. I am putting together my weekly message for tomorrow to my congregation, many of whom are older — I so appreciate the New Yorker article on aging. The balance between optimism, realism, and poetry in this piece hits a sweet spot — and offers lots of food for thought. The French call “senior” life “Le Troisieme Age” (the third age), which I love as a redefining concept . . . I always look forward to reading and perusing your posts! They keep me in touch with my best self, balanced, and connected to a vital voice for wholeness (and joy!).

    1. Hi Ann U. I truly appreciate your thoughtful comments. The aging article is an excellent one. Regarding “Le Troisieme Age” -love it- I was thinking how much nomenclature matters. I would propose that people over 80 be named the Wisdom Keepers, 70-80 the Elders and 60-70 Prime Adults. We have so much to contribute. Young people spend far too little time with Elders and miss out on the benefits from our knowledge and experience. My dad is 99 and my greatest inspiration!
      I’m honored that you are a devoted reader of Love and Medicine.
      Keep reading and sharing your thoughts! Dr. Annie K.

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